Otology: Hearing & Balance

Jason Brant, MD

Audiometric Phenotyping of Penn Medicine Biobank Enrollees

This research study invites patients who are enrolled in the Penn Medicine Biobank to have
hearing testing. We are looking for people with normal hearing or with any amount of hearing loss, so
that we can improve the quality of hearing loss evaluation. If you agree to join the study, you will be asked to complete the following research procedures:
1. Have standard hearing testing (1 visit)
2. Let us collect information about you and your health from your medical record
3. Let researchers use your information for approved studies

Subject Population: Adults who participated in the Penn Medicine Biobank

Duration of Subject Participation: About half an hour

Contact: Dr. Jason Brant (215) 662-2777

Michael Ruckenstein, MD

Music Perception and Complex Auditory Processing in Hearing Loss and Cochlear Implantation

This research study is designed to help us to better understand how patients with cochlear implants or hearing loss enjoy music and how this changes over time. You can choose how much involvement with the study you would like to have:
1. You may choose to participate only in the office, which will take about 15 minutes, and can be done during your visit. This will involve listening to some music and answering questions about what you heard and about your music listening habits. We may also contact you before future office visits to see if you would be willing to participate again.
2. You may choose to complete this initial survey, plus monthly music surveys for 1 year. You would get these additional surveys by email and complete them at home.
We will also review your medical records regarding your hearing.

Subject Population: Adults with cochlear implants or hearing loss

Duration of Subject Participation: About 15 minutes or up to 1 year

Contact: Dr. Tiffany Hwa Tiffany.Hwa@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Long-term Outcomes of Hearing Preservation Cochlear Implant Surgery with Electro-Acoustic Stimulation Devices

This research study is being done to look at the long-term benefit of electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) hearing devices. This will help us to know what patients can expect in the long-term after implantation with these devices and to understand the natural progression of hearing loss after implantation. If you agree to join the study, you will be asked to complete the following research procedures:
1. Travel to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to have hearing testing with an audiologist.
2. Fill out a short online survey about whether you still use your EAS device, and the amount of time that you typically use it.

Subject Population: Adults who had an electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) device implanted at the time of their cochlear implantation because they had good natural low-frequency hearing

Duration of Subject Participation: About 1 hour

Contact: Dr. Alexandra Quimby

Music Re-Engineering and Enjoyment after Cochlear Implantation

This research study is designed to help us to better understand whether music re-engineering can help patients with cochlear implants or hearing loss enjoy music. In this study, you would answer some basic questions regarding your hearing health, overall health, and musical listening habits. You would listen to a series of short, popular songs from various musical genres, and rate your enjoyment of the music. During the survey, you will have an opportunity to use the website to “mix” or change music to your liking. We will also review your medical records regarding your hearing.

Subject Population: Adults with cochlear implants or hearing loss

Duration of Subject Participation: About half an hour

Contact: Dr. Tiffany Hwa Tiffany.Hwa@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Comparison of Failure Rates for Surgical Intervention vs. Primary Observation in Glomus Jugulare Tumors

Glomus retro

This is a reterospective study and patient’s medical chart will be reviewed. The purpose of the study is to evaluate failure rates of radiation and primary observation for tumors. We anticipate that this information will allow determination of patient and tumor characteristics that aid in predicting whether or not a patient will respond to primary radiation therapy.

Evaluating Vestibular Testing Findings in Central and Peripheral Vestibular Disorders

Vestibular Testing D/B

This study is a retrospective study. A chart review of patients who underwent vestibular testing from 2005-2018 will be performed. This study would benefit our understanding of how vestibular testing correlates with vestibular disorders.

Cochlear Implants for Single-Sided Deafness

The goal of this study is to investigate how the auditory system of patients with SSD interprets sound inputs when their hearing in the affected ear is restored using a CI. Electrical potentials from the brain are recorded while participants listen to sounds in one or both ears. Participants with a CI are similarly presented to either the CI, the opposite ear, or both.  We compare the groups to determine how well the auditory system is processing sound information from the implant.